Gather 'round, it's history time for my new perfumes

Remember when I used to write about history? Probably not because it's been sooo long. Well, I'm about to fix that because I have 4 brand new perfume tributes to let you know about! Madame MoustacheA Perfumed Oil for Fancy Ladies & Gentlemen of Exceptional Quality

On the American Frontier you needed backbone and sheer wit to not only survive, but prosper. Eleonore Alphonsine Dumont, aka Madame Moustache, had both in stride. Originally born in France (at least that's what she claimed), Dumont was a notorious gambler hustling her way through mining camps and gambling houses in the West. She amassed a small fortune only to lose it all to a man of charm, but little substance. With dogged determination Dumont upped her gambling efforts and started her own gambling house "Vingt-et-un" (21) a saloon for stylish gents, no women, save for herself, allowed. Her charm made her the perfect, unassuming gambler, and with the addition of running a brothel, she found her fortune back in excess. When her beauty faded she became known as Madame Moustache, owing to a line of dark hair on her lip - which she wore with pride.

Madame Moustache Perfume Oil contains notes of tobacco pipe, vegan Egyptian musk, fire, and vanilla. This alluring scent is meant for fancy ladies and well kept gents, and smells like a warm campfire.

VIII: A Cologne Oil Worthy of Kingly Pursuits

Before he became the rotund, belligerent king of his twilight years, young King Henry VIII was a stylish youth deeply interested in the arts, education, sport, and was a devout Catholic called a Defender of the Faith by Pope Leo X. As the second son of Henry VII, he was never expected to become king, but when he did, he did so with lavish excess and cultivated an image of a Renaissance man. Henry VIII's obsession with producing a male heir (partly his own vanity, and partly a desire to avoid another War of the Roses) is what led to the two things he is widely known for: the English Reformation and his six wives.

England's most famous king had a soft spot for the finer things in life and was said to wear a concoction of ambergris and civet, two of the finest scents of the time. This cologne oil inspired by the illustrious Tudor has notes of ambergris, belladonna, clovebud, tobacco, bay leaf, fire, and Peru balsam.

Archibald MensiesA Cologne Oil for Explorers of Merit & Other Fearless Pursuits

Back in the 1700s there was still a large swath of Earth left unexplored, especially in the New World. Archibald Menzies was a Scottish surgeon who moonlighted as a botanist and naturalist. He was hired aboard George Vancouver's HMS Discovery that traveled around the world and is of particular note here in Seattle as they were some of the first to explore Puget Sound. Like Charles Darwin, who wasn't even born until 15 years after the Discovery expedition, Archibald Menzies documented plant life and cultivated seeds. He discovered the Douglas Fir and brought/planted orange seeds in Hawaii (still there to this day) for future ships stopping there to port (oranges helped with scurvy).

This cologne oil features blood orange, oak moss, Egyptian musk, tobacco, and fir. Dab some on your wrist and go exploring.

Beatrix PotterA Dead Writers Perfume

Beatrix Potter was the author and illustrator of the beloved children's story, The Tale of Peter Rabbit. She was born to a wealthy Victorian family and after summering in the Lake District as a child, she began her lifelong work as a naturalist and conservationist. Using the royalty money from the success of her book she bought Hill Top Farm and surrounding areas in an effort to keep the English countryside pristine.

In Peter Rabbit she wrote, “Peter was not very well during the evening. His mother put him to bed, and made some chamomile tea: "One table-spoonful to be taken at bedtime.” This perfume was created after reading these lines to my own child. Beatrix has notes of moss, blue spruce, dragon's blood, fire, earth, and chamomile. It has a wonderful green scent with the light floral of the chamomile headnote.

Let me know how you like them!